Thomson Reuters Foundation

Want to boost women’s careers? Raise their expectations

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By Judith Rodin, President, The Rockefeller Foundation and Monique Villa, CEO, Thomson Reuters Foundation

One of the advantages of the digital revolution is its immediacy. You read the news together with the readers’ reaction; you flick through pictures understanding how people relate to them. It’s a much more enriching experience, because it triggers a debate. So we thought we would bring the same approach to statistics. Take women’s rights, for example. Every year, authoritative reports track the number of women entering the workforce, their academic qualifications, and their average salaries. But this set of data doesn’t tell us the whole story. It doesn’t correlate with how women feel, how they fare day-to-day in the workplace, what they see as major obstacles to their career progress. To fill that gap, we decided to join efforts and to ask women directly, across the G20 countries. The findings were very revealing. (more…)

Thomson Reuters Foundation finds its Global Ambassador

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By Antonio Zappulla, Director of Strategy & Communications, Thomson Reuters Foundation

In March, the Thomson Reuters Foundation hosted a week-long event to showcase its work and impact: Foundation Week. The event engaged thousands of Thomson Reuters employees across offices in London, New York, Eagan, and Bangalore.

During Foundation Week, our 2015 Foundation Global Ambassador Challenge was unveiledThe initiative offered all Thomson Reuters employees the opportunity to engage directly with the Foundation’s work. (more…)

Become a better communicator in one day

London

Drawing on the values and global footprint of the world’s largest provider of news and information, our Foundation brings training solutions to companies, governments and organizations worldwide.

We’re pleased to announce the latest round of corporate communications instructor-led workshops in London, which are designed to make an immediate impact on participants’ professional capacities. We favor an interactive approach where delegates work on relevant case studies and get instant feedback from their peers and instructors.

Available courses: (more…)

Human trafficking – Big data will help combat a big issue

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Last month, the Thomson Reuters Foundation brought some of Europe’s biggest financial firms together with law enforcement authorities in London, uniting their resources to combat modern day slavery. The financial institutions met with Europol and the UK’s National Crime Agency to identify the behaviors of potential people traffickers, to understand the dynamics of this global challenge and to ensure a greater understanding of how financial data might uncover the criminals.

The Thomson Reuters Foundation ran a similar project in the USA in 2012 with the office of Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance Jr, which was credited with increasing significantly the reporting of suspicious transactions which might be linked to this cruel trade. The challenge is great, but the need to act is greater. More than 35 million people are effectively enslaved – trapped in forced and bonded labor, sexual exploitation, and other forms of servitude. Four in five of the victims identified in the EU are female.

The criminals involved use and generate significant amounts of cash – this fast-growing crime is estimated to be worth more than $150 billion worldwide – so clearly the money will emerge in the financial system at some point. The challenge for banks and law enforcement agencies alike is to identify such transactions and turn them into actionable intelligence which can lead to breaking the criminal networks.

It is astonishing that more than two centuries after the UK outlawed slavery that this practice can endure across the world. It is right, then, that we use the best in 21st century technology to track and ultimately unmask the beneficiaries of this vast criminal enterprise. At Thomson Reuters, we are working with clients and voluntary bodies to develop resources for companies which will help them to scrutinize their own supply chains and their sources of labour down to the subcontractor level.

The Thomson Reuters Foundation and the members of this new working group are to be commended for their contribution to stamping out this crime. Together they are marshaling considerable forces against those who seek to profit from slavery, and one that has no place in modern society.

Trust Forum Asia: Fighting domestic slavery and slavery in the fishing industry

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The inaugural Trust Forum Asia, held on June 17 in Hong Kong, brought together more than 200 influential business and thought leaders to discuss real solutions to fight modern-day slavery and forced labour across Asia, a region with 60% of the world’s modern day slaves. Watch the wrap video of the event.

Aligned with the spirit and mission of the Foundation’s annual Trust Women conference, Trust Forum Asia touched upon a range of pressing issues, including protecting migrant workers and domestic “helpers” trapped in servitude, to achieving justice for exploited slaves in the multi-billion dollar fishing industry. The Forum also featured stories of survival and looked at the role of corporations in cleaning up supply chains.

It was truly remarkable day. Mrs. Anson Chan, the first woman and the first Chinese to hold the second-highest governmental position in Hong Kong, argued that the welfare of migrant workers must be a joint responsibility between home and host country government authorities. She stressed that both countries must monitor agencies fees and empower workers to know and defend their rights. (more…)

How law firms are helping tomorrow’s businesses in emerging economies

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Tomorrow’s entrepreneurs are finding leaner, more cost-effective platforms to raise their essential finance, and a fascinating report issued this week shows law firms around the world are offering their skills voluntarily to helping social enterprises develop sustainable and successful businesses.

Economic development and microfinance projects are supported by some 40 percent of law firms which contributed to the second TrustLaw Index of ProBono. TrustLaw is the Thomson Reuters Foundation’s global pro bono legal program, and its index charts the amount of work law firms across the world are providing on a free, voluntary basis to charities, non-profits, social enterprises and individuals.

The report analyzed data provided by 141 firms from 77 different countries, representing over 49,000 lawyers. It found that over the last 12 months, these lawyers donated 2.08 million hours of free legal support, on average investing about one week (43 hours) of their time assisting clients on a pro bono basis.

According to the report, the unprecedented rates of economic development across Asia and the Pacific have attracted international law firms to these rapidly emerging economies, bringing with them the culture of pro bono activity. (more…)

Camera exposure: Q&A with Prabir Talukdar

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India-based photojournalist Prabir Talukdar was the winner of the 2015 Trust Women Photo Award, a joint initiative by the Thomson Reuters Foundation and Microsoft. Prabir’s work was selected from nearly 500 submissions received from 90 countries. Photographers across the world were challenged to submit images capturing the lives and stories of remarkable women in their communities. #WomenMakeItHappen reached six million people on social media.

In March, 10 finalists were selected by a distinguished panel of experts, including: Finbarr O’Reilly, Yale World Fellow and former Reuters photographer; Carla Eid, Global Head of Social Engagement at Microsoft Mobile; Belinda Goldsmith, Editor-in-Chief of the Thomson Reuters Foundation; Roger Anis, 2014 Trust Women Photo Award winner; and Laura Bates;Founder of the Everyday Sexism Project.

“Prabir’s photos beautifully illustrate the strength and resourcefulness of women battling poverty, illness and discrimination in India, a country where women are constantly challenging deep-rooted views about traditional gender roles and the lower status of women,” added Belinda Goldsmith, Editor-in-Chief of the Thomson Reuters Foundation.

In addition to the award, Prabir will receive an all-expenses paid trip to attend a week-long professional training course on Mobile Journalism organised and run by Thomson Reuters Foundation, and a Microsoft Lumia 930 phone. Prabir’s work will also be showcased at the upcoming Trust Women Conference 17-18 November in London.

We spoke to Prabir about his career and the challenges facing women in India. Read more below. (more…)

Q&A with Timothy Large, Director of Media Development and Training

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At the Thomson Reuters Foundation, we stand for free, independent journalism, human rights, women’s empowerment, and the rule of law. We expose corruption, the human impact of climate change, and play a leading role in the global fight against human trafficking and slavery. We use the skills, values, and expertise of Thomson Reuters to run programs that trigger real change and empower people around the world. We tackle global issues. We achieve lasting impact. Explore our 2014 Thomson Reuters Foundation Annual Report

We sat down with Timothy Large, head of Media Development and Training, to take a look back at 2014, and forward at what’s in store for 2015.

You became the head of Media Development in 2014. What are you most excited about going forward?

I’m most excited about programs that have tangible impact on the ground. The evidence shows that training on its own is often not enough to guarantee that great journalism is widely consumed, so we’ve taken a more holistic approach that addresses every link in the media development chain from the incubation of professional skills right through to editorial support to get actual stories published and distributed. Sometimes that even means setting up independent news agencies, as we’ve done in Iraq, Egypt and Zimbabwe. (more…)

Thomson Reuters Foundation spotlight: Media development and training

Fans take photos with their mobile phones during the VH1 Divas Salute The Troops show in San Diego

At the Thomson Reuters Foundation, we stand for free, independent journalism, human rights, women’s empowerment, and the rule of law. We expose corruption, the human impact of climate change, and play a leading role in the global fight against human trafficking and slavery. We use the skills, values, and expertise of Thomson Reuters to run programs that trigger real change and empower people around the world. We tackle global issues. We achieve lasting impact. Explore our 2014 Thomson Reuters Foundation Annual Report

For over 30 years, we have been fostering the highest standards of journalism, drawing on the expertise and global footprint of Reuters. We believe accurate and independent media lead to better informed societies. They hold power to account and contribute to economic and social development.

We have gone beyond the traditional concept of journalism training and run initiatives ranging from the creation of sustainable, independent news platforms to a wide selection of skills and mentoring program. This unique mix allows us to provide world-class solutions to pressing needs, helping excellent journalism reach the largest possible audience.

Training without borders

No subject or territory is off limits. In 2014, we trained nearly 1,000 journalists in countries as diverse as Mauritania, Rwanda, Kazakhstan, Fiji, Jordan and Bolivia. In Mauritania, we tackled taboo subjects such as rape and sexual harassment. In November, we hosted the very first journalism course assessing best practices to report human trafficking and slavery. (more…)

Q&A with Belinda Goldsmith, Editor-in-chief of the Thomson Reuters Foundation

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At the Thomson Reuters Foundation, we stand for free, independent journalism, human rights, women’s empowerment, and the rule of law. We expose corruption, the human impact of climate change, and play a leading role in the global fight against human trafficking and slavery. We use the skills, values, and expertise of Thomson Reuters to run programs that trigger real change and empower people around the world. We tackle global issues. We achieve lasting impact. Explore our 2014 Thomson Reuters Foundation Annual Report

We sat down with Belinda Goldsmith, Editor-in-chief of the Thomson Reuters Foundation, to take a look back at some of the major stories covered and impact the coverage achieved.

Your team covers stories that are often overlooked by the mainstream media. What is the ultimate goal?

We cover stories at the heart of aid, development, women’s rights, human trafficking, climate change, and corruption. These are some of the world’s most pressing issues, but often those affected by them have no voice. We want to ensure that these people are not forgotten, and raise awareness about these often underreported issues. We don’t campaign, and we are not involved in advocacy; all of our stories are fair, accurate and impartial, leaving readers to form their own opinion.

2014 was a year full of major news events. What was the most unexpected story your team had to cover?

As we cover humanitarian disasters that are often overlooked by other media, when a big crisis strikes we are often already there. Take Ebola, for example. Our West Africa correspondent was the first international journalist to reach the remote village of Gueckedou, Guinea, where the Ebola outbreak began. It was only two months later that the international community started to pay attention to the virus. Recently we returned to Guinea to visit the village where it all started and interviewed the father of the first victim of Ebola, the two-year-old boy the world knows as Patient Zero. (more…)