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All of us will be passengers on the road to the future

IAA

Every day, Thomson Reuters touches millions of automobile aficionados around the world, including people who design vehicles, regulate their safety, invest in automakers, provide tax advice to them, sue and defend manufacturers and suppliers, and, in the case of the 2015 Frankfurt Auto Show which is currently underway, marvel at the sleek lines, speed and agility of the concept cars that offer unique and wonderful views of a future of which we all want to be a part. In the next few days were running a series of blog posts that will provide glimpses into the professional lives of our customers touching the auto industry, through proprietary data, insights and expert analysis that only Thomson Reuters can deliver.

Nothing captures the imagination of the public faster than a discussion on the car of the future. The driving public have been dreaming about flying cars for decades, and recently Toyota made headlines when a patent application suggesting they were working on one was published. Now in this case US20150246720 describes “an aerocar including a stackable wing and methods for morphing the stackable wing…atop the aerocar,” as opposed to a fully functional flying vehicle, so in reality we are probably many years away from a time when we can fly to work during our daily commute.

Cars that drive themselves were also a part of the automotive dreamscape that is until recent advances, most publicly by Google, demonstrate that the future of autonomous driving may be closer than previously thought. Experts claim the technology is still years away from being viable in all traffic conditions, but that has not stopped Google from conducting field tests, or Apple from apparently speaking with the State of California about autonomous driving regulations. Beyond these news reports, the automotive industry in general has filed a significant number of patents in the autonomous driving field, and Figure 1 shows the trend in autonomous driving patent published by the top six filers in the field over the last three years. (more…)

The future of the auto industry: A Thomson Reuters point of view

New Audi A4 2.0 T quattro, Audi e-tron Quattro and Audi S4 are presented during the media day at the Frankfurt Motor Show (IAA) in Frankfurt

Every day, Thomson Reuters touches millions of automobile aficionados around the world, including people who design vehicles, regulate their safety, invest in automakers, provide tax advice to them, sue and defend manufacturers and suppliers, and, in the case of the 2015 Frankfurt Auto Show which is currently underway, marvel at the sleek lines, speed and agility of the concept cars that offer unique and wonderful views of a future of which we all want to be a part.

What goes into bringing these provocative new cars to market? The concept car is someone’s best guess at a future, yet we’re now looking at one involving cars that are not driven by people and are connected to our personal network, as well as the Internet of Things. Apple, Google, Tesla, Uber and other technology giants are emerging players in the space.

Auto manufacturing is a global industry with a sprawling web of workflows, labor forces and international supply chains. There is steep competition in every class of vehicles so the need to innovate and differentiate is high. Moreover, the auto industry is highly regulated in areas such as safety, emissions, fuel economy and dealership networks. With stakes so high – including the lives and livelihoods of people – safety issues alone can cost millions of dollars in the form of new regulatory hurdles and class-action litigation. (more…)

Smartphone comparison – Graphic of the day

This weekend, Samsung unveiled its latest Galaxy S smartphones. Today’s graphic compares a selection of flagship smartphones from major manufacturers.

smartphone comparison

Would you like infographics like this on your website, blog or other social media? Contact us and visit our Reuters Agency blog for insights and discussions on the changing media industry.

Material design workshop at Google

Google signage seen at the company's offices in New York

By Natalia Paraeva, Lead Mobile User Experience, Thomson Reuters

Last November, I had the great privilege of attending the material design workshop run by Google at their New York office. It ran over two days and involved great conversations, an opportunity to talk to a dozen of Google designers and get all questions answered. If you’ve never heard of material design, you might find this video interesting.

Google themselves put it this way: “Material design is a cross-platform design system grounded in tactile reality, inspired by our study of paper and ink, yet open to imagination and magic.” In that video, design leads across Google discuss the key principles of material design, and set the stage for the other sessions that focused on interaction, motion and visual design.

The other companies that attended the workshop were: (more…)

Google tells Supreme Court no copyright protection exists for Java APIs

From Westlaw Journal Computer & Internet: A federal appeals court incorrectly found Oracle America could sue Google for copyright infringement for replicating elements from Java’s application programming interfaces, or APIs, in the Android smartphone operating system, the search engine giant has told the U.S. Supreme Court.

Google admits it replicated elements from 37 Java API packages, which Oracle America owns.  However, it argues in its petition to the nation’s highest court, the elements it replicated — as well as their structure, sequence and organization — are not subject to copyright protection as a matter of law.

(WestlawNext users: Click here for the 10 most recent stories from Westlaw Journals.)

(more…)

Mini tablets compared – Graphic of the day

Apple posted better-than-expected revenue yesterday on the back of a record iPhone launch that saw 39 million of the smartphones sold in the September quarter. Last week, the company introduced its new iPads. We already took at look at how the iPad Air matches up against its competition. Today we scale it down a bit to see how the iPad mini compares to its major competitors on the market.

mini tablets

Would you like infographics like this on your website, blog or other social media? Contact us and visit our Reuters Agency blog for insights and discussions on the changing media industry.

Tablets compared – Graphic of the day

Yesterday Apple introduced the iPad Air 2, a faster, slimmer version of its predecessor with other modest improvements. Today’s graphic compares the new iPad to four of its major competitors on the market.

tablets

Would you like infographics like this on your website, blog or other social media? Contact us and visit our Reuters Agency blog for insights and discussions on the changing media industry.

Use per se standard to judge Silicon Valley wage-fixing case, workers tell court

From Westlaw Journal Antitrust: A class-action lawsuit accusing six high-tech companies of conspiring to fix and suppress employee wages and mobility should be analyzed as a per se, or inherently illegal, antitrust violation, a group of employees has argued in a new court filing.

A per se violation is afforded an irrebuttable presumption of anti-competitive effect from a defendant’s alleged conduct, while the other approach, the rule of reason, looks at whether the alleged conduct’s anti-competitive effects outweigh its pro-competitive justifications.

(WestlawNext users: Click here for the 10 most recent stories from Westlaw Journals.) (more…)

Flagship smartphones compared – graphic of the day

Amazon’s new smartphone, which joins their “Fire” lineup of tablets and streaming devices, aims to stand out in a crowded field dominated by Apple and Samsung. The new 3D Fire phone seeks to offer shoppers instant gratification by recognizing thousands of products, television shows and songs and allowing users to immediately buy them on Amazon. Today’s graphic compares the new Amazon Fire to six major competitors on the smartphone market.

Amazon Fire Phone

Would you like infographics like this on your website, blog or other social media? Contact us and visit our Reuters Agency blog for insights and discussions on the changing media industry.

Is our own Dr. Garfield the grandfather of Google?

Dr. Eugene Garfield is synonymous with innovation at Thomson Reuters.

As the creator of the Science Citation Index (SCI) and the founder of the Institute of Scientific Information, now Scientific & Scholarly Research (SSR), his work forever changed research discovery and analytics.

But developing citation indexing – the cornerstone of the SCI, which involved harnessing the footnotes, or cited references, in scholarly publications – also earned him the title “grandfather of Google.”

Founding father of modern citation analysis (more…)