Science

The World in 2025 – Food shortages and price fluctuation are a thing of the past

It’s human nature to want to know what’s coming. It seems fitting, then, that our IP & Science business, with innovation at its core, should also partake in leveraging its assets to forecast the future. The following is one prediction from our new report that features 10 innovation predictions for the world in 2025. Make sure to check out the entire series of posts and download the full report here.

Advancements in lighting technologies and imaging techniques, coupled with genetic crop modification, provide an environment ripe for successful indoor crop growth and detecting diseased foods.

World-2025_pdf__page_12_of_28_Simultaneous revolutions in both lighting technologies and imaging techniques will have far reaching effects in the next decade. Advancements in Organic Light Emitting Diodes, LCD and plasma technologies, alongside three-dimensional displays coupled with hyperspectral imaging, will improve year-round crop growth, helping feed the world’s eight billion people and overcoming environmental changes that will affect traditional farming.

In 2025, genetically modified crops will be grown rapidly and safely indoors, with round-the-clock light, using low-energy LEDs that emit specific wavelengths to enhance growth by matching the crop to growth receptors added to the food’s DNA. Crops will also be bred to be disease resistant. And, they will be bred for high yield at specified wavelengths.

Imaging techniques such as three-dimensional displays coupled with hyperspectral imaging will also be able to provide early detection of mal-developing crops and diseased animal proteins before human consumption.

Because there is reduced risk of crop failure, price fluctuations and food shortages will become things of the past.

Download the full report: The World in 2025: 10 Predictions of Innovation

Hepatitis C & HCV therapy development – graphic of the day

In recognition of World Hepatitis Day, we prepared a special infographic highlighting significant shifts that have taken place in the Hepatitis drug market. The world changed for many HCV sufferers in December 2013, with the launch of Sovaldi – an effective cure for chronic disease in almost 90% of subjects with type 1 infection. Or did it?

HCV

The World in 2025 – Type 1 diabetes is preventable

It’s human nature to want to know what’s coming. It seems fitting, then, that our IP & Science business, with innovation at its core, should also partake in leveraging its assets to forecast the future. The following is one prediction from our new report that features 10 innovation predictions for the world in 2025. Make sure to check out the entire series of posts and download the full report here.

A versatile human genome engineering platform is a reality, paving the way for the modification of disease-causing genes and helping to prevent certain metabolic conditions.

World-2025_pdf__page_10_of_28_Like type 2 diabetes, type 1 diabetes and other metabolic conditions such as muscular dystrophy will be preventable in 2025, but not by diet and exercise. Advancements in ribonucleic acid-guided (RNA-guided) engineering used for specialist sequence synthesis will be so much more sophisticated that a human genome engineering platform will exist. The pillar biological molecules of life on earth: RNA, DNA and proteins, and the roles they play, will be understood much more clearly in the next decade.

The in-depth operations of RNA, the main pathways from DNA to proteins, and proteins, the cell’s worker bees that carry out various catalytic and structural functions, will be demystified. The RNA/DNA process of passing inherited genetic information from one generation to the next will be clear. Increased knowledge of these biological pillars will make genomic-editing-and-repairing DNA a reality in humans, not just in bacteria and mice.

Also a reality will be the patenting of organisms and partial DNA segments, thereby complicating the landscape of who owns rights to what and where the line between nature and commerce exists. The human genome engineering platform will pave the way for the modification of disease-causing genes in humans, leading to the prevention of type I diabetes, among other ailments.

Download the full report: The World in 2025: 10 Predictions of Innovation

Cortellis Data Fusion

Thomson Reuters Cortellis™ Data Fusion (formerly Entagen’s Extera) enables new scientific and strategic insights by connecting your proprietary content with the world’s data, utilizing Big Data and Linked Data technologies. A powerful data core technology is used to aggregate entities and create associations between them, enabling organizations to securely integrate Life Sciences content from a variety of sources. Cortellis Data Fusion is the leading technology to explore hidden relationships between data entities and is used by top pharma and research institutions for applications such as target finding, drug repurposing, and precision medicine. The technology earned Entagen a spot on Gartner’s prestigious list of ‘Cool Vendors in Life Sciences’; and was named a winner in the Mass Technology Leadership Council (MassTLC) Technology Leadership Awards for ‘Innovative Technology of the Year: Big Data’.

The World in 2025 – Solar is the largest source of energy on the planet

It’s human nature to want to know what’s coming. It seems fitting, then, that our IP & Science business, with innovation at its core, should also partake in leveraging its assets to forecast the future. The following is one prediction from our new report that features 10 innovation predictions for the world in 2025. Make sure to check out the entire series of posts and download the full report here.

Methods for harvesting, storing and converting solar energy are so advanced and efficient that it becomes the primary source of energy on our planet.

SolarThanks to improvements in photovoltaic technology, chemical bonding, photocatalysts and three-dimensional nanoscale heterojunctions, the use of the sun as the world’s primary source of energy is no longer for the environmentally- conscious select; it is for the masses.

The sun’s energy will be harvested much more efficiently. Its energy will be stored and used when needed. And the conversion of solar power will be much more efficient.

Solar thermal and solar photovoltaic energy (from new dye-sensitized and thin-film materials) will heat buildings, water, and provide energy for devices in the home and office, as well as in retail buildings and manufacturing facilities.

Chemical bonds, a photosynthetic process, will make solar energy available when needed. Increased efficiency of energy conversion will be realized through new materials such as cobalt-oxide and titanium-oxide nanostructures, photocatalysts and 3D nanoscale heterojunctions; while new methods using mesoscopic oxide films sensitized by dyes or quantum dots will contribute to improving the 2014 solar conversion efficiency rate of less than 10 percent.

Download the full report: The World in 2025: 10 Predictions of Innovation

The World in 2015 – Dementia declines

It’s human nature to want to know what’s coming. It seems fitting, then, that our IP & Science business, with innovation at its core, should also partake in leveraging its assets to forecast the future. The following is one prediction from our new report that features 10 innovation predictions for the world in 2025. Make sure to check out the entire series of posts and download the full report here.

Analysis and understanding of the human genome will have far-reaching effects in 2025. As Baby Boomers begin to reach their 80s, more and more scientific research funds will be directed toward afflictions they may encounter.

World-2025_pdf__page_6_of_28_Current neurodegenerative disease research is focused on identifying pathogenic chromosomes that influence the onset of diseases. This work is vital to understanding human genetic variations and will enable scientists to begin to fix genetic malfunctions, such as those impacting dementia patients.

Scientific studies of dementia sufferers have been able to isolate specific chromosomes that cause different forms of the disease, including autosomal dominant frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), among others. The identification of chromosome 9p and its genetic link to dementia, for instance, is a first step in the war on this devastating condition.

In 2025, the studies of genetic mutations causing dementia, coupled with improved detection and onset-prevention methods, will result in far fewer people suffering from it.

Such fundamental research is not yet represented in patents, because pure medical research may not be patented. As techniques and enabling technologies develop, it will be more visible in patent publications. And, as the global population ages, preventing these diseases through understanding the genetics will become increasingly important.

Download the full report: The World in 2025: 10 Predictions of Innovation

Visionary data

Thomson Reuters information tools provide insights into the progression of knowledge and invention over many decades—in the case of Web of Science, as far back as 150 years. At the same time, by illuminating current areas of emergence, concentration, and rapid growth, these resources offer a look ahead. It is fitting, therefore, that our IP & Science business released a new, forward-looking report, The World in 2025, which mines the scientific literature and patent data to make predictions about how innovation and technology will affect our lives and our world in the coming decade.

In preparing the report, IP & Science analysts studied publication and citation data from Web of Science to identify particularly active areas of fast-moving and emerging research. Scrutiny of global patent data from Derwent World Patents Index revealed areas that are currently yielding prolific numbers of recent inventions. Ultimately, the analysts arrived at 10 predictions, reflecting hot spots of innovation that will lead to tomorrow’s biggest breakthroughs.

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The speed of knowledge

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Neil Masterson, Executive Vice President and Chief Transformation Officer at Thomson Reuters, participated in a panel discussion at the Aspen Ideas Festival on the Speed of Knowledge. The premise of the session, with co-panelist Ken Davis, CEO and president of Mount Sinai Health System, and moderator Ezekiel (Zeke) Emanuel, was that the drug discovery and development process is changing, and the implications of those changes in healthcare are very real.

Innovation related to drug discovery, development and commercialization is increasing, as Mr. Masterson pointed out. There was a 3% increase in global pharmaceutical patent activity from 2012 to 2013, with nearly 63,000 unique inventions processed last year. And, the players are much more global. It is not just the US and Europe, but Asia and other developing countries are becoming more active participants. For instance, the University of Nanjing was the top patenting organization globally for pharmaceutical heterocyclics. (more…)

Ebola virus disease – graphic of the day

Ebola, which first appeared in outbreaks in Sudan and DR Congo in 1976, is a severe and often fatal disease with no known specific treatment or vaccine. It has since killed more than 1,500 people in parts of Africa. An epidemic in currently out of control in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone and requires massive resources from governments and aid agencies to prevent it spreading further. This is the deadliest outbreak since Ebola first emerged in central Africa. Today’s graphic diagrams the Ebola virus, showing the source, transmission and damage caused by the disease.

ebola

Would you like infographics like this on your website, blog or other social media? Contact us and visit our Reuters Agency blog for insights and discussions on the changing media industry.

Is our own Dr. Garfield the grandfather of Google?

Dr. Eugene Garfield is synonymous with innovation at Thomson Reuters.

As the creator of the Science Citation Index (SCI) and the founder of the Institute of Scientific Information, now Scientific & Scholarly Research (SSR), his work forever changed research discovery and analytics.

But developing citation indexing – the cornerstone of the SCI, which involved harnessing the footnotes, or cited references, in scholarly publications – also earned him the title “grandfather of Google.”

Founding father of modern citation analysis (more…)