Science

The most promising drugs of 2015

Drugs to watch

In January 2014, Thomson Reuters Cortellis Competitive Intelligence named three drugs to watch that were expected to enter the market that year and make sales of over $1 billion within five years. All three entered the market as anticipated, and although the Cortellis Consensus sales forecasts have fluctuated over the course of the year, all of the drugs are still forecast to be $1 billion-plus blockbusters.

Compared with 2014, there are more potential blockbusters expected to enter the market this year. The majority of them are forecast to have 2019 sales of between $1 billion and $3 billion, although three drugs are set to exceed this, with the following 2019 sales forecasts: Bristol-Myers Squibb’s (BMS) melanoma drug Opdivo (nivolumab) at $5.684 billion; Regeneron Pharmaceuticals and Sanofi’s Praluent (alirocumab) for hypercholesterolemia at $4.414 billion; and Novartis’ LCZ-696 (sacubitril and valsartan) for chronic heart failure at $3.731 billion: (more…)

Wait, What? Episode 4: Hey! I think I saw that in a movie…

REUTERS/Eric Vidal

In the fourth installment of Wait, What? the team discuss the “science fact” that has come from the science fiction of Star Trek, Star Wars, Total Recall, comics, and other media. The show starts with a comparison of the devices that were used in the Star Trek universe of television and movies, and how we’re seeing many of those ideas and concepts come to fruition. The guys then get into the concept of 3-D printing and synthetic biology. The discussion then shifts to Jason and Joe announcing that they’ve created the “Inertia-jet” (patent pending), that will revolutionize travel, and what it must feel like to be the first person/people to test a potentially dangerous piece of technology.

The team spend much of the second half of the show in a “lightning round” discussing different sci-fi influencers to include Star Wars, James Bond, Disney, and comic books. Most importantly they discuss if we currently are at a stagnation point in technological improvements to our lives. This spawns a great discussion about time travel!

As always, stick around after the music at the end of the show for something extra.


(more…)

Metrics Mania

Metrics Mania

Thomson Reuters Metrics Mania, a unique competition that measures the research impact of the the 68 institutions competing in the 2015 NCAA Men’s Basketball Tournament, will align those same schools in six rounds of weekly competition to determine the final winner of the Research Crown. Winners will be identified by reports pulled from Thomson Reuters InCites.

The competition will begin Monday, March 16th and close with the naming of the champion on Tuesday, April 7th. Fans are invited to submit brackets with their predictions of the winners beginning March 16. Participants will be awarded one point for each correct guess. At the conclusion of the contest, the 10 entrants with the most points will each be awarded a $100 American Express Gift Card.

Get notified when brackets are available.

Follow Metrics Mania on Twitter @InCites_TR and join the conversation at #metricsmania.

 

Why incredibly unlikely things keep happening

Improbability Principle

The improbability principle says that we should expect identical lottery numbers to come up more than once, lightning to strike twice, and financial crashes to occur. It says that apparently improbable events are actually commonplace. At Thomson Reuters we provide the information that our customers use to help them make many types of prediction and judgment – and we know that there is a clear benefit in predicting something unexpected that your competitor hasn’t.

At our second Data Science Insights event, chaired by Reuters Lead Anchor Axel Threlfall, Professor David Hand, Emeritus Professor at Imperial College London, will speak on the subject of his book, “The Improbability Principle”. Professor David Hand points to five laws that together make up ‘The Improbability Principle,’ and can lead to dramatic miscalculation when predicting how likely something is to happen.

The Law of Selection

(more…)

‘Incentivizing good health: The legal issues presented by health-contingent wellness plans,’ by R. Scott Oswald, Esq., and Tom Harrington, Esq.

 

 

For a one-minute audio intro to the commentary, click here.

WestlawNext users: Click here to read the full article on WestlawNext.

R. Scott Oswald

R. Scott Oswald

Tom Harrington

Tom Harrington

Black holes – Graphic of the day

The creation of supermassive black holes remains an open topic of research. However, many scientists have long believed the growth rate of black holes was limited. That is until they discovered a black hole so big that it challenges the theory about how they grow. Today’s graphic diagrams how black holes form.

black holes

Would you like infographics like this on your website, blog or other social media? Contact us and visit our Reuters Agency blog for insights and discussions on the changing media industry.

Snow days – Graphic of the day

Record-breaking winter weather has put much of the U.S. Northeast in a deep freeze this month. Boston broke its own record last week for the snowiest February in the city’s history. Today’s graphic tracks the recent snowfall across the United States.

snow days

Would you like infographics like this on your website, blog or other social media? Contact us and visit our Reuters Agency blog for insights and discussions on the changing media industry.

The meaning

Hear from our global employees what working at Thomson Reuters means to them. These employees support offerings associated with the lifecycle of innovation, enabling today’s agents of change through the discovery, protection and commercialization of their ideas and brands.

Interested in working at Thomson Reuters? Come join our global team.

Cochlear – Partners in Innovation

A case study on how Thomson Reuters helps Cochlear achieve their innovation goals and manage their intellectual property workflow.

Learn more about our IP & Science business.

‘Accommodation of mental disabilities under the ADA,’ by Kirsten M. Eriksson, Esq.

 

 

For a one-minute audio intro to the commentary, click here.

 

WestlawNext users: Click here to read the full article on WestlawNext.

Kirsten Eriksson

Kirsten Eriksson