Commentary & Analysis

‘Defense Department imposes new cyberobligations on contractors,’ by Mary Ellen Callahan, Esq., Mark Nackman, Esq., Cynthia Robertson, Esq., and R. Locke Bell, Esq., Jenner & Block

 

For a one-minute audio intro to the commentary, click here.

WestlawNext users: Click here to read the full article on WestlawNext.

Mary Ellen Callahan

Mary Ellen Callahan

Mark Nackman

Mark Nackman

 

Cynthia Robertson

Cynthia Robertson

R. Locke Bell

R. Locke Bell

 

 

 

Making agricultural aviator safety a priority

By Roger A. Dreyer, Esq., Dreyer Babich Buccola Wood Campora LLP

From Westlaw Journal Aviation: Attorney Roger A. Dreyer of Dreyer Babich Buccola Wood Campora LLP discusses a recent case he tried regarding the fatal flight of an agricultural pilot in California and what can be done to prevent similar deaths.

(Westlaw users: Click here for the 10 most recent stories from Westlaw Journals.) (more…)

‘The FAA (re)acts: Drone registration, a federal task force, and hefty fines,’ by William O’Connor, Esq., Chris Carr, Esq., William Goodwin, Esq., and Nikita Tuckett, Esq., Morrison & Foerster

 

 

For a one-minute audio intro to the commentary, click here.

WestlawNext users: Click here to read the full article on WestlawNext.

William O’Connor

William O’Connor

Chris Carr

Chris Carr

Nikita Tuckett

Nikita Tuckett

William Goodwin

William Goodwin

A global information and intelligence platform to combat modern day slavery

RTX1EKZ3

This week Thomson Reuters unveils a potential new weapon in the fight against modern day slavery. We are inviting the community of anti-slavery organizations to work with us to create a global information and intelligence sharing platform.

The International Labour Organization estimates forced labour is a $150 billion industry which enslaves some 21 million people.

The reputational risk to companies unwittingly exposed to slavery in their supply chain is now added to a real legal risk. At our anti-slavery seminar this week, attended by more than 170 people, I sat with Kevin Hyland, the UK’s anti-slavery commissioner and therefore the chief enforcer of the Modern Slavery Act. The Act requires firms to report formally on how they are seeking to combat slavery across their supply chains. And since those supply chains routinely span countries and continents the Act has global reach.

(more…)

Message to sports chiefs: stamp out bribery or lose your sponsors

football

This week suspended FIFA president Sepp Blatter made some jaw-dropping revelations to Russia’s Tass news agency about how the World Cup bidding process was run. But football’s sponsors will also have noted this observation from Blatter:

“You cannot destroy FIFA,” he said. “FIFA is not the Swiss bank. FIFA is not a commercial company.”

This follows hard on the heels of comments from Formula 1 chief Bernie Ecclestone, who defended Blatter on Russian TV, claiming corruption should be considered as a tax that has to be paid: (more…)

‘Insurance for the sharing economy,’ by Mark R. Goodman, Esq., Freeborn & Peters LLP

 

 

For a one-minute audio intro to the commentary, click here.

 

 

Mark Goodman

WestlawNext users: Click here to read the full article on WestlawNext.

China’s golden era – of interconnectivity

China's President Xi Jinping and Britain's Prince Philip review an honour guard during his official welcoming ceremony in London, Britain

China dominated the headlines in the UK this week. As its president, Xi Jinping, arrived in London with all the pomp of a state visit, the media turned its focus on how and why China was now being considered a strategic trade partner for the UK, with some £40 billion worth of deals signed during the visit.

Before Premier Xi’s visit, the UK Government keenly briefed journalists on the dawn of “a golden era” of cooperation between the two countries. And at a dinner at London’s Guildhall, where the Premier spoke warmly of Britain and its culture, I heard for myself a speech which contained more emotion and affection than the usual statesmanship expected of a visiting dignitary.

China is indeed entering a golden era, though not exclusively with the UK, and not perhaps in quite the way the Government intends. It is a golden era of interconnectivity, as the country creates myriad links to the world’s financial systems. For instance it was interesting how many delegates attended from Canada.

This interconnectivity includes information networks, of course, and just a few weeks ago I saw for myself in Shanghai how busily the financial sector was forging these vital connections. Such links will help them to attract foreign investment for their businesses and to import goods for their growing middle class, as well as maintaining their thriving exports. (more…)

Carbon pricing, cars and carmakers

IAA electric Porsche Mission E

Every day, Thomson Reuters touches millions of automobile aficionados around the world, including people who design vehicles, regulate their safety, invest in automakers, provide tax advice to them, sue and defend manufacturers and suppliers, and, in the case of the 2015 Frankfurt Auto Show which is currently underway, marvel at the sleek lines, speed and agility of the concept cars that offer unique and wonderful views of a future of which we all want to be a part. In the next few days were running a series of blog posts that will provide glimpses into the professional lives of our customers touching the auto industry, through proprietary data, insights and expert analysis that only Thomson Reuters can deliver.

Emissions have been one of the hot topics this week at the Frankfurt Auto Show, right alongside the newest concept cars. Volkswagen AG’s disclosure that it provided inaccurate data to the EPA and other regulators on its diesel engine emissions has moved the markets and made news. The world’s largest automaker ordered its US dealers to immediately halt sales of diesel-powered cars and Martin Winterkorn resigned as CEO.

But the emissions footprint of automakers extends beyond the tailpipes of its cars. Automobile manufacturing itself is a carbon intensive industry, both through its use of materials like steel and aluminum, and the consumer use of its vehicles which are largely fueled by fossil fuels. It’s hard to imagine, but the world currently has 1.2 billion vehicles, and that will grow to 2.0 billion in 2035 according to one forecast. (more…)

‘Employer considerations after the Supreme Court’s same-sex marriage ruling,’ by Anne R. Yuengert, Esq., and Anne Knox Averitt, Esq., Bradley Arant Boult Cummings LLP

 

 

For a one-minute audio intro to the commentary, click here.

WestlawNext users: Click here to read the full article on WestlawNext.

Anne R. Yuengert

Anne Knox Averitt

 

 

All of us will be passengers on the road to the future

IAA

Every day, Thomson Reuters touches millions of automobile aficionados around the world, including people who design vehicles, regulate their safety, invest in automakers, provide tax advice to them, sue and defend manufacturers and suppliers, and, in the case of the 2015 Frankfurt Auto Show which is currently underway, marvel at the sleek lines, speed and agility of the concept cars that offer unique and wonderful views of a future of which we all want to be a part. In the next few days were running a series of blog posts that will provide glimpses into the professional lives of our customers touching the auto industry, through proprietary data, insights and expert analysis that only Thomson Reuters can deliver.

Nothing captures the imagination of the public faster than a discussion on the car of the future. The driving public have been dreaming about flying cars for decades, and recently Toyota made headlines when a patent application suggesting they were working on one was published. Now in this case US20150246720 describes “an aerocar including a stackable wing and methods for morphing the stackable wing…atop the aerocar,” as opposed to a fully functional flying vehicle, so in reality we are probably many years away from a time when we can fly to work during our daily commute.

Cars that drive themselves were also a part of the automotive dreamscape that is until recent advances, most publicly by Google, demonstrate that the future of autonomous driving may be closer than previously thought. Experts claim the technology is still years away from being viable in all traffic conditions, but that has not stopped Google from conducting field tests, or Apple from apparently speaking with the State of California about autonomous driving regulations. Beyond these news reports, the automotive industry in general has filed a significant number of patents in the autonomous driving field, and Figure 1 shows the trend in autonomous driving patent published by the top six filers in the field over the last three years. (more…)