Commentary & Analysis

Sustainable development

1009160_SustainableDevelopment

Welcome to Thomson Reuters Exchange! We created Exchange, as the name suggests, as a forum for dialogue, a digital publication where ideas and insights, information, news and analysis can be exchanged and shared across the global ecosystem of professionals in a dynamic, interactive format. We invite you to experience the rich content and interactive features on your iPad, iPhone or Android tablet by downloading it from the App StoreGoogle Play or on Amazon. Or, to learn more about Exchange and stay abreast of the latest features, functionality and content in this issue and subsequent issues, visit our website.

This week’s post is by Dr. Ranjit Tinaikar, Managing Director of the Advisory and Investment Management business at Thomson Reuters.

Here’s how Big Data and open standards can lower barriers to sustainable development enabling the public and private sectors to work together to achieve greater legal and regulatory transparency: (more…)

Despite the Deutsche Bank fine, an olive branch from the EU

European Commissioner for Financial Services, Jonathan Hill, speaks during a Thomson Reuters Newsmaker event

At last, there is a positive sign. After so many years of reputational damage, the financial services industry has been extended an olive branch by its regulatory masters – and it is one that should be grasped.

The most encouraging indication in many years that financial services has the opportunity to restore its reputation came last week from the summit of EU policymaking. In the midst of the UK’s election frenzy, which has seen the return of much negative comment about our industry, it was good to hear the European commissioner for financial stability issue a challenge for finance to take its rightful place as part of the solution to the EU’s economic troubles.

Lord Hill was speaking at a Thomson Reuters Newsmaker event, principally about Capital Markets Union.

Arguably no individual has greater influence over the future of the financial services industry. The Capital Markets Union he is tasked with establishing could perhaps rival the Single Market in revolutionising the fortunes of the EU’s member states, enabling Europe’s growth businesses to access funding across borders as never before. (more…)

‘When banks don’t do the right thing : Employee options,’ by Adam Augustine Carter, Esq., and R. Scott Oswald, Esq.

 

 

For a one-minute audio intro to the commentary, click here.

WestlawNext users: Click here to read the full article on WestlawNext.

Adam Augustine Carter

Adam Augustine Carter

R. Scott Oswald

R. Scott Oswald

Tracking the latest news on the Africa landscape

Sneha Shah, managing director of Thomson Reuters Africa joins CNBC Africa to discuss some of the latest news impacting the African continent. (more…)

The mobile revolution set to hit financial services

Salesman poses with two Apple Watch look-alike devices at a mall selling electronic products in China's southern city of Shenzhen

By John Manwaring, Head of Mobile and Search, Financial & Risk, Thomson Reuters

2015 is looking set to be the year when wearables will start a revolution in how we use technology in our daily lives. Last year saw a number of developments in the sector, most notably the launch of Google’s Android Wear and Samsung’s Gear S. Now, with the launch of the Apple Watch imminent, it’s not too fanciful to say that wearable devices have already begun to change the way we interact with the world around us, and reshape our expectation of what technology can – and should – be doing for us.

While devices like smartwatches are generally thought of as recreational, as consumers come to adopt them in their daily lives they will inevitably start to impact the way we work too. From tablets to smartphones, mobile technology has already become so ingrained in our daily lives that we are coming to expect there to be a seamless link between how we use technology at home and in the office, and in particular how we receive information through the working day.

At the same time, our working lives themselves are changing. The days of nine to five, of clocking in and out of the office every day, are fast disappearing as we expect more flexibility and autonomy. The financial services industry is no exception to this, and the technology used by financial markets practitioners should change to match. Technology is increasingly being relied upon to deliver information intelligently, where and when it matters most. (more…)

A quick Q&A with Patsy Doerr

cri-qa

Being responsible and ethical is part of the Thomson Reuters heritage – a fundamental pillar of our business. Interest in Corporate Responsibility (CR), sustainability and inclusive business is intensifying, and it’s becoming increasingly clear that CR is not a separate issue at all, but simply part of the way we should do business. Explore our 2014 Corporate Responsibility & Inclusion report.

Patsy Doerr became Global Head, Corporate Responsibility & Inclusion in March 2014. Here we chat to her about what the role means for Thomson Reuters: (more…)

The largest misconceptions about employee satisfaction

At Vancouver-based Talk Shop Media, formed in 2011 through a merger of two smaller public relations firms, the founders say they set goals early on around retaining staff. The company, which today has about 17 employees, has seen very little turnover and works hard to motivate and empower staff to grow with the business. “We wanted to make sure that the team that started with us understood that they could grow with us,” said Talk Shop principal and co-founder Sara Padidar. In addition to a mentoring program, Talk Shop hosts twice-annual staff town hall meetings where they talk about goals and open up the books to show how the money is being made and spent.

Read more about how your happy employee may not be the most loyal one.

Q&A with Monique Villa, CEO of the Thomson Reuters Foundation

Screen Shot 2015-04-08 at 12.22.34 PM

At the Thomson Reuters Foundation, we stand for free, independent journalism, human rights, women’s empowerment, and the rule of law. We expose corruption, the human impact of climate change, and play a leading role in the global fight against human trafficking and slavery. We use the skills, values, and expertise of Thomson Reuters to run programs that trigger real change and empower people around the world. We tackle global issues. We achieve lasting impact. Explore our 2014 Thomson Reuters Foundation Annual Report

We sat down with Monique Villa, CEO of the Thomson Reuters Foundation, to reflect back on 2014, and see what’s in store for 2015: (more…)

Corporate Responsibility & Inclusion Report: Executive introduction

Screen Shot 2015-04-08 at 10.27.13 AM

Being responsible and ethical is part of the Thomson Reuters heritage — a fundamental pillar of our business. Interest in Corporate Responsibility (CR), sustainability and inclusive business is intensifying, and it’s becoming increasingly clear that CR is not a separate issue at all, but simply part of the way we should do business. Explore our 2014 Corporate Responsibility & Inclusion report.

Welcome to our fourth annual Corporate Responsibility & Inclusion report. I am once again privileged to share with you highlights of our performance related to responsible business practices supporting our people, our markets and our world.

I am proud of my colleagues, whose work every day helps to build a high-performing, sustainable business with a positive social impact. Our principles of integrity, freedom from bias and good judgment guide everything that we do, and ensure our 20 million customers receive the highest-quality and most trustworthy information anywhere. As a company built for the Information Age, our products and services help foster a more transparent, connected and empowered world.

Our ability to have a positive impact on the world starts with the way we conduct our own business and we took an important step during 2014 to combine our Corporate Responsibility, diversity and inclusion and sustainability teams into one function. A more connected approach is an important driver of competitive advantage and something our customers are genuinely interested in. (more…)

The weakest link

Screen Shot 2015-03-26 at 3.44.06 PM

Welcome to Thomson Reuters Exchange! We created Exchange, as the name suggests, as a forum for dialogue, a digital publication where ideas and insights, information, news and analysis can be exchanged and shared across the global ecosystem of professionals in a dynamic, interactive format. We invite you to experience the rich content and interactive features on your iPad, iPhone or Android tablet by downloading it from the App StoreGoogle Play or on Amazon. Or, to learn more about Exchange and stay abreast of the latest features, functionality and content in this issue and subsequent issues, visit our website.

This week’s post is by Phil Cotter, Managing Director of Thomson Reuters Risk business.

A multinational organization’s supply chain is only as strong as its weakest link. Good global supply chain management should focus on sustainability, utilizing a risk-based approach to ensure resources are deployed in the most efficient manner. It must be robust enough to expose weak links that may be hiding within complex webs of relationships and interrelationships.

Today’s multinational organizations tend to have multitiered global supply chains including vendors, partners, subcontractors and sponsors, all linked together in complex webs of interrelationships traversing multiple jurisdictions. These complex networks can mask dangerous vulnerabilities: A problem in one area can quickly ripple up and down the chain, leading to severe reputational damage. One of the most effective methods of coping with complex, often hidden risks, especially for companies active in multiple jurisdictions, is to adopt the risk-based approach (RBA) outlined in the Financial Action Task Force’s (FATF) February 2012 “Recommendations for International Standards on Combating Money Laundering and the Financing of Terrorism & Proliferation.” These should be included in the organization’s Know Your Supplier (KYS) processes. (more…)