Commentary & Analysis

‘California’s paparazzi drones and the evolving privacy landscape under AB 2306,’ by Paul Fraidenburgh, Esq., and Assemblyman Don Wagner

 

 

For a one-minute audio intro to the commentary, click here.

 

WestlawNext users: Click here to read the full article on WestlawNext.

Paul Fraidenburgh

Paul Fraidenburgh

Don Wagner

Don Wagner

Who owns great art?

Christie's employees view painting by Warhol at public preview in London

By Christy Klancher, Sr. Attorney Editor, Thomson Reuters

What would you do if your museum has a collection of indigenous art on permanent loan from a country that subsequently passes a law requiring that all of its art must be returned? Would you return the collection?

Would your answer change if you learned that the country will destroy the collection if it gets it back, as part of a plan to erase all evidence of the existence of that indigenous people?

This was one of the questions posed at the wonderful Thomson Reuters sponsored CLE (Continued Legal Education) session which I recently attended. It was called Who Owns Matisse? Who Owns Art? A Panel Discussion on Law and Art, and took place at the Minneapolis Institute of Arts. (more…)

The growing role of bitcoin: What’s next for cryptocurrencies?

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Welcome to Thomson Reuters Exchange! We created Exchange, as the name suggests, as a forum for dialogue, a digital publication where ideas and insights, information, news and analysis can be exchanged and shared across the global ecosystem of professionals in a dynamic, interactive format. We invite you to experience the rich content and interactive features on your iPad or Android tablet by downloading it from the App StoreGoogle Play or on Amazon. Or, to learn more about Exchange and stay abreast of the latest features, functionality and content in this issue and subsequent issues, visit our website.

This week’s post is by Vincenzo Dimase, FX Market Development Manager Europe West at Thomson Reuters.

Since their introduction in 2009, cryptocurrencies have attracted the attention of a variety of stakeholders in the financial community, from private investors to financial institutions and authorities. In the new landscape of cryptocurrencies, bitcoin has the highest market capitalization.

Leveraging advanced encryption technologies, bitcoins: (more…)

The Conversation: An Open Dialogue

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Welcome to Thomson Reuters Exchange! We created Exchange, as the name suggests, as a forum for dialogue, a digital publication where ideas and insights, information, news and analysis can be exchanged and shared across the global ecosystem of professionals in a dynamic, interactive format. We invite you to experience the rich content and interactive features on your iPad or Android tablet by downloading it from the App StoreGoogle Play or on Amazon. Or, to learn more about Exchange and stay abreast of the latest features, functionality and content in this issue and subsequent issues, visit our website.

Exchange invited two customers – Markus Schulz, Chief Compliance Officer at GE Capital International and Errol Hoopmann, Managing Director at Dubai Financial Services Authority – to talk about what “open” means and why it matters to our industry.

Exchange: What does “open” mean to you as an individual in your day-to-day role?

Markus Schulz: Open to business. Open to new ideas. Open to change. And change most likely being the only constant in business life these days. But (also) “open” as opposed to “closed,” e.g., substitute “open” with “we want” and “closed” with “we don’t want.” (more…)

Exchange Magazine: Open for business

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In the new issue of Thomson Reuters Exchange Magazine we turn our focus to an important topic in the financial industry: Open. It is a concept that touches every aspect of the business, whether it is open data, open platforms or open messaging.

Highlights from this issue include Thomson Reuters Tim Baker, Head of Content Strategy and Innovation, and Andrew Fletcher, Senior Manager Data Innovation Lab, on how to transform open data into intelligence; Vincenzo Dimase, FX Market Development Manager, on the growing role of bitcoin and what’s next for the cryptocurrency market; Corey Cherr, Thomson Reuters Head of Agriculture, Weather Research and Forecasts explains why it’s so important to get out in the field to harvest truly valuable agricultural data; and a feature on China, the world’s largest economy.

Also in this issue:

Get your free copy of Exchange on iOS and Android tablet devices in the Apple App Store, Google Play and Amazon Appstore. Or visit the Thomson Reuters Exchange Website to read individual articles.

Culture – Part Five

I’ve been publishing a series of posts here on our company blog to summarize core cultural themes from my perspective, all of which support our Thomson Reuters purpose and values. The fifth part of my culture series explains why we need an engine to move us forward, regardless of the challenges we face along the way. That engine is confidence. Performance is impossible without confidence. Read parts onetwothree & four.

Know yourself

The dictum “Know thyself” (γνῶθι σεαυτόν) was apparently carved into the rock at the Temple of Apollo at Delphi, for the benefit of visitors who had come to consult the Oracle (priestess) and hear her prophesies. Today we think of the word ‘prophesy’ as meaning to predict the future, but in fact, the origin of the word is the ‘spokesperson or advocate of the gods / God’.  Prophesy is in fact the act of explaining the true state of the world through divine knowledge. In ancient wisdom: a person’s future is a function of their fate and their fate is a function of who they are, here and now. So a visit to the oracle was in fact a voyage of self discovery. To understand your future, understand yourself. To change your future, change yourself. Only through self-knowledge can we achieve true confidence. To trust the world around us, we must first trust ourselves.

Be prepared

It is natural to feel a lack of confidence if you don’t feel ready to tackle the challenge ahead. To change your future, you need to change yourself. If you lack the technical knowledge to do something, go learn it! Read up, ask others, take a course, or experiment. If you are wary of meeting with a customer, make sure you understand their business and offerings thoroughly. You create value when you connect the two. We fear what we do not understand. Thorough preparation is perhaps the single best thing you can do to improve your confidence heading into a situation. Have a plan, ask questions, study up, equip yourself! Curiosity builds confidence.

Practice! (more…)

Space flight accidents should be investigated by the NTSB

By Ronnie R. Gipson Jr., Esq., Higa & Gipson

From Westlaw Journal Aviation: Attorney Ronnie Gipson of Higa & Gipson discusses the need for the National Transportation Safety Board to take an active role in investigating accidents resulting from the developing commercial space industry.

With two high profile accidents in the last week, the commercial space industry is understandably being subjected to heightened scrutiny.  Editors note: This article was originally published Nov. 5.  Specifically, with respect to the Virgin Galactic’s SpaceShip Two accident, detractors quickly seized on innuendo and rumor to place blame on inadequate pilot training and possible malfunctions with technological advances to the craft’s engines.

(WestlawNext users: Click here for the 10 most recent stories from Westlaw Journals.) (more…)

‘Social media in the workplace: Around the world 3.0,’ by Daniel Ornstein, Esq.

 

 

For a one-minute audio intro to the commentary, click here.

WestlawNext users: Click here to read the full article on WestlawNext.

Daniel Ornstein

Daniel Ornstein

I know the feeling

Comet

I’ve currently been on an extended trip through Europe, but last week, one of the biggest news stories was the landing of the Philae probe on a comet. It marks the first time that we have been able to achieve such a feat. The entire mission has been one series of innovations after another, and personally, I’m so happy for the engineers in the European Space Agency (ESA) command center who have seen their dream become a reality.

Although the Philae probe has now gone into a hibernation status due the inability of the probe to recharge its batteries, it has accomplished a number of key objectives including sending pictures back from the comet and sending science data from all of its on-board instruments including the COSAC – the Cometary Sampling and Composition experiment – which drilled into the comet in search of molecular building blocks that may have kickstarted life on planets like Earth.

I was reading the Sunday Times, and it had a great article written by Bryan Appleyard titled “One Giant Step.”  I genuinely appreciated his comments about this project for a number of reasons. Have a read of this quote: (more…)

Culture – Part Four

I’ve been publishing a series of posts here on our company blog to summarize core cultural themes from my perspective, all of which support our Thomson Reuters purpose and values. The fourth part of my culture series explains how agility enables us to get things done effectively and efficiently. It is the best way for us to reach excellence and relies on our focus on truth. It simply enables performanceRead parts onetwo & three.

Break work into small batches

The utter core of agility is to break tasks down into small batches, in fact into the smallest viable unit. Then get that batch done 100%, review, learn, adjust plans if necessary, and then move on to the next small batch. This simple approach allows us to dramatically lower the risk of projects – improving both quality and time to market — by giving us continuous opportunity to learn and adjust along the way. “Big bang” projects, where you toil for a long period of time before having anything to show for it, are almost destined to fail. The ‘small batch’ approach is the heart of the lean movement, which is just another way of looking at agility. Not only do you want to keep each batch small, but you should strive for the utmost simplicity in the whole project. That is how you move fast and light.

Be ‘Antifragile’

Agility is by its nature Antifragile. The continuous agile process of learning from the past, taking in new inputs from the present, being able and willing to change course, and back up when you’re headed down the road, is the heart of why biological systems can resist entropy and in fact grow strong in the face of adversity. Agility/antifragility naturally give you optionality, which is a powerful form of leverage.

Try stuff out (more…)