Around Thomson Reuters

Knowledge Worker Innovation Series: Transformative data visualization

Transformative data visualization

Inspired by a neighborhood of innovators and entrepreneurs, the Knowledge Worker Innovation Series consists of events that bring in thought leaders from industry and academia to discuss, dissect and explore technology topics and trends. The discussions helps us stay on top of and share the ideas that shape our approach to making information intelligent and delivering it to the businesses and professionals who depend on it.

We are pleased to announce the fifth event in our Knowledge Worker Innovation Series, proudly held in Boston’s Innovation District. Enormous quantities of data go unused or underused today, simply because people can’t visualize the quantities and relationships within. The ability to convey specific data in a clear and understandable manner is a mix of science and art. Ben Fry, data visualization expert, will discuss principles of graphics design and dynamic visualization that can improve the insight gained from data. Ben will detail how all data problems begin with a question and end with a narrative construct that provides a clear answer without extraneous details. He will share several examples of projects and how each visualization conveys the unique properties of the data it represents: why the data was collected, what’s interesting about it, and what stories it can tell. (more…)

Reuters awarded the 2014 Pulitzer Prize in International Reporting

REUTERS/Jim Bourg

For two years, they investigated human-rights abuses, bringing the international dimensions of the Rohingya to global attention. Reuters journalists Jason Szep, Andrew R.C. Marshall and team were honored with the first-ever text Pulitzer Prize won by Reuters for their series on the oppression of the Muslim Rohingya of Myanmar. As a result of their work, more than 900 people were freed from brutal trafficking rings.

The Pulitzer committee recognized the team for “…their courageous reports on the violent persecution of the Rohingya, a Muslim minority in Myanmar that, in efforts to flee the country, often falls victim to predatory human-trafficking networks.”

Reuters was also recognized as a finalist in two additional categories. A series by Megan Twohey, which exposed the underground market for adopted children, was named a finalist in the Investigative Reporting category and Goran Tomasevic was named a finalist in the Breaking News Photography category for a series of photographs documenting frontline combat in Syria.

Read more from the Pulitzer Prize winning series: (more…)

What more do you need to know?

REUTERS/Jorge Silva

Our 2013 Annual Review brings our company story to life by showcasing how we support today’s decision makers by providing global information platforms that are faster, simpler and more connected. You can access the full-report here or check out the complete series of blog posts.

As information becomes the most powerful global currency, the boundaries between traditional sources of knowledge begin to disappear. The first flickers of insight can come from anywhere: a tweet about a takeover rumor; a blog post revealing a data breach; social media chatter about a regime that has to change.

And even as the sea of information grows exponentially, people expect to tap into it from wherever they happen to be, whether they’re out in the streets, rushing through a crowded airport, or crossing a hotel lobby in London or Mumbai. Professionals who have to make fast, informed judgments still depend on in-depth news and analysis – but they also want instant connections to specialized expertise half a world away. They need to scan social networks and spot something meaningful in the buzz. And they’re looking for tools to help gauge the prevailing mood online and predict where it may be heading.

At Thomson Reuters, this emerging reality is reflected in every dimension of our business. We build on our long history of innovation to meet the needs of customers whose priorities are changing as rapidly as the world around them. From standard-setting news and financial information services, to data-rich tax and accounting solutions, to acclaimed research tools for scientists and the legal profession, we support today’s decision makers with what they need most: global information platforms that are faster, simpler and more connected. (more…)

A year of impact

Annual report slides6[12]

Impact, growth and women. These are the three words that best define 2013 at the Thomson Reuters Foundation.

It’s been an exceptional year.

TrustLaw, our service connecting NGOs and social enterprises with lawyers offering free legal assistance, has grown exponentially. In 2013, we made a significant impact in India, with 200 registered members. We also expanded in China – where we now have 10 law firms – and in Brazil and South Africa, hiring staff to facilitate the recruitment of both law firms and organizations that benefit from the service.

Trust Women, our flagship conference dedicated to putting the rule of law behind women’s rights, brought together top decision makers in the fields of law, finance, business, technology and government, reaching 1.5 million people through social media. Participants took 32 strong commitments to action.

As a direct result of Trust Women 2012, together with the Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance Jr, I co-hosted a working group to encourage some of the biggest banks in the USA to contribute to the fight against human trafficking. The financial institutions accepted to share suspicious data with law enforcement agencies, and the working group issued international guidance aimed at helping the wider financial communities to identify and report irregularities in financial transactions that might be linked to human trafficking. The Thomson Reuters Foundation distributed the document to a select number of top financial institutions, law enforcement agencies and anti-trafficking NGOs. (more…)

Continuing our evolution to meet the needs of today’s professionals: Our 2013 Annual Review

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We are pleased to announce the launch of our multimedia 2013 Annual Review.

Today’s professionals operate in a world that doesn’t wait for anyone to catch up. Like our customers, we are aggressively pursuing the opportunities presented by a complex, demanding and constantly changing marketplace.

Building on our history of innovation, which stretches back more than a century, we help our customers stay ahead of the tsunami of information with global information platforms that are faster, simpler and more connected.

Along with our Letter to Shareholders and a look-back at our legacy of innovation, the Annual Review summarizes our 2013 financial performance and highlights our: (more…)

Continuing our evolution to meet the needs of today’s professionals: Our 2013 Annual Review

tokyo_fullsize

We are pleased to announce the launch of our multimedia 2013 Annual Review.

Today’s professionals operate in a world that doesn’t wait for anyone to catch up. Like our customers, we are aggressively pursuing the opportunities presented by a complex, demanding and constantly changing marketplace.

Building on our history of innovation, which stretches back more than a century, we help our customers stay ahead of the tsunami of information with global information platforms that are faster, simpler and more connected.

Along with our Letter to Shareholders and a look-back at our legacy of innovation, the Annual Review summarizes our 2013 financial performance and highlights our: (more…)

Inside the World Economic Forum on Latin America

WEF brainstorm board

It all starts with significant resources.

I’m talking about the World Economic Forum (WEF) itself, as an international institution, as well as those it brings together so famously. Besides its annual global forum in Davos, Switzerland, the WEF also hosts regional agendas, such as the current forum on Latin America this year taking place in Panama City, Panama.

Here, alongside Thomson Reuters colleagues from Colombia, Peru, and Argentina, there are executives from companies like AGCO, Bombardier, Banco Itaú, Nestlé and Visa; a governmental  presence with Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto and various trade ministers; international thinkers such as Moisés Naím (Carnegie Endowment for International Peace); and heads of regional and international organizations, such as the Secretary-General for the Organization for American States.

Topics of this year’s forum – infrastructure, foreign trade, human capital and talent, preparing for growth, the role of government, and transparency – all aim to support the motto of the forum: Committed to Improving the State of the World. (more…)

Book by high-profile author Lewis may spur high-frequency-trading reform push, success unclear

During a clip on Sunday night’s “60 Minutes” program, host Steve Kroft asked bestselling author Michael Lewis why he was so opposed to high frequency trading.

“If it wasn’t so complicated, it would be illegal,” said Lewis, who is the author of a new book called “Flash Boys: A Wall Street Revolt.”  (more…)

Women leaders of the data revolution roundtable: Insights and inspiration

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In celebration of 2014 International Women’s Day, I was pleased to host and participate on a panel of some of today’s most celebrated women leaders of the data revolution. Joining me in London were Mary Fratto Rowe, SVP of Salesforce.com, Fiona Capstick, Office of the CIO, IBM, Sue Baldwin, Head of Vendor Relations, JP Morgan, and Martina King, CEO, FeatureSpace. Moderated by Reuters News Editor, Jane Barret, we had a very robust and insightful discussion on Big Data. What are the trends?  The challenges?  The opportunities?  And how women can better own and advance their careers in a traditionally male dominated industry.

Here are some of the key takeaways from our discussion: (more…)

Without Ida?

As many readers will already know, Saturday, March 8th was International Women’s Day.

During the past 160 years, women’s roles within Thomson Reuters have (gradually) changed. In some of my previous posts I have highlighted the careers of some of those women who advanced this process. However, this year, I think it would be worth going right back to the very beginning. Let’s remind ourselves of the purposeful woman whose contribution helped to ensure that a struggling young company called Reuters got off the ground in the first place?.

That woman was Ida Magnus, who had become Mrs. Reuter.

Ida was an intelligent, well-educated, hard-working and perceptive married woman. But, in 1845, she had no outlet for her abilities other than through her husband. Could Paul Julius have done it all without Ida working side-by-side with him? The question has frequently been asked. As early as 1941, Warner Brothers made this modern idea a major storyline of its biopic A Dispatch from ReutersRather surprisingly (or perhaps, not!) the Reuters Archive holds not a single photograph or image of her.

If you would like, I will go on to tell you more about Ida Reuter and her role in the early days of Reuters News Agency. But to start, we really have to go right back even before that – with the choice of the name Reuter.

Some six years ago, I posted a blog recounting how this happened. I don’t think I would write it differently today. I hope you will agree that it is worth another airing.

It was called What’s in a name? (more…)