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TechVision: Celebrating women in technology

You are invited to attend our next TechVision event, Celebrating Women in Technology, on Thursday, May 28 from 5:00 to 6:00 p.m. at our offices at 3 Times Square – 30th floor, Carnegie Hall.

James Powell, Chief Technology Officer, Thomson Reuters, will welcome a diverse panel of influential women in technology who empower change and inspire innovation. A cocktail reception and opportunity for networking will follow the panel discussion.

We are pleased to present this event in partnership with the National Center for Women & Information Technology (NCWIT)’s Sit With Me campaign, the Women@Thomson Reuters network and the Thomson Reuters Data Innovation Lab.

Meet the panelists:

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Despite the Deutsche Bank fine, an olive branch from the EU

European Commissioner for Financial Services, Jonathan Hill, speaks during a Thomson Reuters Newsmaker event

At last, there is a positive sign. After so many years of reputational damage, the financial services industry has been extended an olive branch by its regulatory masters – and it is one that should be grasped.

The most encouraging indication in many years that financial services has the opportunity to restore its reputation came last week from the summit of EU policymaking. In the midst of the UK’s election frenzy, which has seen the return of much negative comment about our industry, it was good to hear the European commissioner for financial stability issue a challenge for finance to take its rightful place as part of the solution to the EU’s economic troubles.

Lord Hill was speaking at a Thomson Reuters Newsmaker event, principally about Capital Markets Union.

Arguably no individual has greater influence over the future of the financial services industry. The Capital Markets Union he is tasked with establishing could perhaps rival the Single Market in revolutionising the fortunes of the EU’s member states, enabling Europe’s growth businesses to access funding across borders as never before. (more…)

Wait, What? Episode 7: I love watching train wrecks

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The latest installment of “Wait, What?” starts out with the show’s reaction and discussion of the latest movie trailer for the Star Wars – The Force Awakens. For the non-nerds in our listening audience, you can fast forward a couple minutes to get to the meat of the podcast. The guys jump into a discussion about a non-government related collection of Personally Identifying Information (PII) and how that differs from government sanctioned collection of data, and where it differs (if it does at all). The guys also discuss “opting-in” to PII collection (“Little Brother“) versus the Orwellian version of Big Brother and how our choices affect this (or if we even have a choice anymore).

The discussion then evolves into a productive debate – with typical Wait, What? humor – over the importance, need for, and ramifications of collecting a person’s data. This rolls nicely into a discussion about the apparent acceptance of video/audio surveillance in modern society and how people seem to simply to not care that they are being recorded.

The show is very pleased to announce that we will be attending Awesome Con in Washington, D.C. at the end of May. We hope to get some on-the-spot interviews with some celebrities and other attendees. The next show will air on May 8, when we discuss the unintended consequences of technology.

We’d like to keep the show as interactive as possible, so please send in your feedback, thoughts, and show ideas. Also, you can reach the team on Twitter: Matt Angelicola (@MattAngelicola), Joe Harris (@Jwh37), Rob Russell (@batogato) and Jason Thomas (@jasonthomas). We’re also on iTunes – just enter “Legal Current” in the search box.

Listen below: (more…)

White House Correspondents’ Dinner preview

U.S. President Barack Obama is shown on a screen as he speaks during the White House Correspondents' Association Dinner

By Kate Friedrich, Vice President, Government Affairs

As the White House Correspondents’ Dinner and the surrounding activities are approaching, let’s take a brief look at the history and evolution of the event as well as our company’s participation and relationship with the government.

The White House Correspondents’ Association (WHCA) has been holding its annual dinner since 1920. It has grown significantly over the years, to well over 2000 attendees. The dinner serves as a scholarship benefit for worthy students in college journalism programs as well as an opportunity to recognize the winners of WHCA’s annual journalism awards. This year, Thomson Reuters is donating a scholarship to the program to honor this tradition. Over the years, the event has transformed into a star-studded affair dubbed “Nerd Prom” for its unique mix of politicians, journalists, celebrities and the DC elite.

Thomson Reuters and Reuters News Agency have enjoyed a long tradition of participation in the dinner and its surrounding events. (more…)

Covering the world’s under-reported stories

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At the Thomson Reuters Foundation, we stand for free, independent journalism, human rights, women’s empowerment, and the rule of law. We expose corruption, the human impact of climate change, and play a leading role in the global fight against human trafficking and slavery. We use the skills, values, and expertise of Thomson Reuters to run programs that trigger real change and empower people around the world. We tackle global issues. We achieve lasting impact. Explore our 2014 Thomson Reuters Foundation Annual Report

Journalism is one of the pillars of the Thomson Reuters Foundation. We cover the stories that are often overlooked by the mainstream media: aid and development, women’s rights, the human impact of climate change, corruption and modern-day slavery. We believe that raising awareness can trigger debate and lead to open, fair, prosperous, tolerant societies. That is our ultimate goal.

Thirty correspondents across five continents and a growing network of more than 100 contributors enable us to cover unique and original stories globally. The Reuters distribution network disseminates our content to one billion readers each day.

Taxpayers – Funded Abuse

We investigated the living conditions of workers at a Canadian-owned palm oil plantation in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Our story, by Chris Arsenault, revealed that the workers were paid $1 a day for intense field labor and were hosted in dilapidated homes. (more…)

Dining on data – food and the future

A woman walks through a field with bio-diesel in the north-eastern Greek region of Thrace near the town of Xanthi

The third Data Science Insights talk will take place at Imperial College, London on 12 May at 5pm. Click here to register to attend.

The supply chains that feed the world and transport all our goods are global. But they are fragile; vulnerable to climate change, extreme weather, natural disaster, wars and political unrest. As the global population heads towards 8 billion, one of the biggest challenges we face is feeding ourselves. Thomson Reuters recently predicted that advances in genetically modified foods and advances in agricultural technology will make food shortages and price fluctuations a thing of the past by 2025.

Beyond the limits of supply

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Generic drugmaker Teva makes $40 billion bid for Mylan – Graphic of the day

Yesterday, Teva made an unsolicited $40 billion offer for smaller rival Mylan. Today’s graphic shows the top 10 pharmaceutical deals over the last year.

Teva Mylan

Would you like infographics like this on your website, blog or other social media? Contact us and visit our Reuters Agency blog for insights and discussions on the changing media industry.

 

Reuters Newsmaker: Capital markets union

European Commissioner for Financial Services, Jonathan Hill, speaks during a Thomson Reuters Newsmaker event

Breaking down barriers to completing the single market in Europe

A Reuters Newsmaker with Lord Jonathan Hill, European Commissioner for Financial Stability, Financial Services, and Capital Markets Union (CMU) indicated that a wave of regulation from Brussels since the financial crisis may ease on his watch but there would be no repeals of legislation.

The event on Friday (April 17), hosted by Reuters Editor at Large Axel Threlfall and introduced by President of Financial & Risk David Craig, was Lord Hill’s first speech to London’s financial community since his appointment to the European Commission last November.

David Craig said: “We are now a quarter-century on from the historic Maastricht Treaty, which promised free movement of capital within the EU. Perhaps Lord Hill is the man who can finally deliver.”

The aim of CMU reforms, and some $338 (Euro 315) billion in investment, is to kick start growth in Europe. Lord Hill described a lack of jobs and growth as the biggest threat to financial stability in the region. (more…)

Dementia’s daunting rise – Graphic of the day

The world’s population is graying as it grows – the number of people over 65 will more than double by 2050, contributing significantly to the rise in dementia cases. The estimated annual worldwide costs of dementia is at least $604 billion and projected to rise to $1 trillion by 2030. In some high-income countries, one-third to one-half of people with dementia live in resource -and cost- intensive residential or nursing homes. 62% of people with dementia live in developing countries, which is expected to rise to 71% by 2050.

dementia

The search for causes and cures:

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Q&A with Alisha Miranda, TrustLaw Director

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At the Thomson Reuters Foundation, we stand for free, independent journalism, human rights, women’s empowerment, and the rule of law. We expose corruption, the human impact of climate change, and play a leading role in the global fight against human trafficking and slavery. We use the skills, values, and expertise of Thomson Reuters to run programs that trigger real change and empower people around the world. We tackle global issues. We achieve lasting impact. Explore our 2014 Thomson Reuters Foundation Annual Report

TrustLaw is a story of continuous growth. Tell us about your expansion in 2014.

2014 was a tremendous year for us: we more than doubled the number of connections made in 2013, recruited new firms, and facilitated the first connections in places as diverse as Myanmar, Taiwan, South Korea, and New Zealand. We also grew in places where we were already present, expanding our reach and building deeper relationships, from India to Africa to Europe.

The TrustLaw Index of Pro Bono has quickly become the benchmark for monitoring trends across the pro bono industry. What were the overall findings?

This was really the first poll of its kind, and quite an ambitious project. The goal was to provide a global assessment of trends and benchmarks across the pro bono legal industry on a country-by-country basis. We were thrilled with the response: 103 law firms provided data on their work across 69 different countries. The data highlighted a lot of interesting facts and trends. We were happy to see that the average value of pro bono per lawyer was actually $11,000, and that they had done over 1.5 million hours of pro bono in 2013. (more…)