Around Thomson Reuters

Something to sh-out about!

Nick Creswell, Thomson Reuters VP, Performance and Talent Management, has been named as one of the world’s top 100 out and proud LGBT (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual & Transgender) business leaders, in a list compiled by OUTstanding and published by The Financial Times.

Nick’s global outlook began in his childhood: he lived in 16 homes by the age of 16 – moving everywhere from Hong Kong to Denmark as he followed his Army father’s career. He developed a lifelong love of travel, and has worked for global companies such as Google, Korn/Ferry and United Biscuits before arriving at Thomson Reuters in 2009. Here are five things to know about Nick:

Beliefs

Nick CreswellNick believes companies have a big role to play in supporting LGBT employees. “Even in the UK, one in four LGBT people aren’t out to their colleagues, and three in four don’t come out to their customers,” he says. “This means they might cover up things about themselves such as who their partner is, who they spend time with at the weekend, whose photo they have at their desk. Whether someone chooses to come out is a personal choice – but all of us deserves an environment where we can be ourselves.”

“When I started work 20 years ago, I never thought I’d be out in the office. Now in the UK we’ve got equal marriage, adoption rights and partner benefits. It’s taken strong role models, and campaigning by so many people to change things.  We’ve come a long way here – but as there are still over 70 countries where it’s illegal to be gay, and seven where it’s punishable by death, globally we still have a long way to go. Progressive, global organisations such as ours and those named in the LGBT leaders list will play a part in change.”

Passions

Nick’s greatest passion is LGBT equality. “I remember 25 years ago when it was normal for politicians in the UK to make derogatory speeches about LGBT people. We had the notorious law Section 28, which banned teachers from counselling gay students. I was a teenager then, and the debate made me determined to change things. I enjoy being involved in our Pride At Work Network: it’s a great network of people who want to create an open, inclusive environment in all our offices. I firmly believe we all have a role to play in making this happen for everyone – regardless of their location, sexual orientation or gender identity.” (more…)

Kimberley Cole discusses career opportunities in Asia

Kimberley Cole, Head of Sales Specialists, Asia, discusses her career at Thomson Reuters & explains why the company is a great place to work.

To learn more about working at Thomson Reuters, visit our career site.

To view all current opportunities in Asia, click here.

Employee profiles: Intelligent information starts with talent

At Thomson Reuters, we are trusted for the decisions that matter most, empowering customers to act with confidence in a complex world. Our intelligent information starts with talent. Businesses and professionals all over the globe rely on the people of Thomson Reuters to transform knowledge into action, so they can shape outcomes on the world stage. That’s why we’re showcasing some of our employees that help deliver solutions that enable our customers to do amazing things. Read the brief interviews below and check out the entire series here.

David Bernard – Head of Product Strategy, Banking & Research (F&R)

What do you see as the key to successful innovation? 

BernardExecuting, trialing, learning from limitations and mistakes.

What is the best leadership tip you’ve learned in your career? 

From a general when I was in the army: “Leadership consists of getting someone else to do something that you want done because he wants to do it.”

What is something you’ve done that people said you couldn’t do? 

Run five marathons in the Alps in five days.

Andrew Martens – Global Head of Product & Editorial (Legal) (more…)

TechTalk: Building trust – TransferWise is just getting started

TransferWise

Trust

Trust plays a key role in TransferWise. If you just picked someone at random you wouldn’t trust them to take your money and then pay you in another country. So why would you trust a start-up to do it?

TransferWise works by matching money flows. Money doesn’t move between countries every time someone wants to make a transfer. Instead, the system relies on someone wanting to move money from, say, London to Paris at about the same time as someone else wants to move money from Paris to London. So, overall the sums balance out and you can just make the two transfers within each country. The result is a process which is faster, cheaper and easier than the banks – a strong incentive to those thinking of trying out the service.

It all started after Taavet Hinrikus moved to London from Estonia. He was still working for Skype and had to do the ‘walk of shame’ to stand in the long queue at the bank in Estonia and get his wages transferred to the UK. When his money eventually arrived it was much less than he expected from looking at the mid-point exchange rate. Instead, he was able to find a friend who wanted to transfer money from the UK to Estonia and they could just ‘swap’ the money. The leap to TransferWise was the realization that this was a problem faced by millions of people, with trillions being transferred every year.

How pensioners took the leap of faith (more…)

Knowledge Worker Innovation Series: “Automation or Augmentation of Knowledge Work Jobs?” with Thomas H. Davenport

Knowledge Worker Innovation Series

Inspired by a neighborhood of innovators and entrepreneurs, the Knowledge Worker Innovation Series consists of events that bring in thought leaders from industry and academia to discuss, dissect and explore technology topics and trends. The discussions helps us stay on top of and share the ideas that shape our approach to making information intelligent and delivering it to the businesses and professionals who depend on it.

We are pleased to announce the next event in our Knowledge Worker Innovation Series, proudly held in Boston’s Innovation District. Many economists have all but ceded many middle and lower-skill jobs to automation, but high-end knowledge workers have always been deemed safe from automation-driven job loss. However, the rise of analytics and other decision-oriented technologies  is beginning to put those roles at risk. Please join us to hear from Tom Davenport who will describe which types of jobs are most at risk, and over what timeframe potential disruptions in knowledge work might take place. Most importantly, he will argue that there are ways that knowledge workers can make it likely that their work is augmented by technology rather than fully automated by it. (more…)

Trading on diversity: Women’s Bond Club networking event

WBC

Gender diversity on boards has been the subject of study for some time, and by a wide variety of organizations and methodologies. Nearly all the research shows that while there are more women on boards each year, progress is slow. Hoping to provide some objective and comprehensive data around the topic from Thomson Reuters own data and analytical capabilities, as well as to spur further dialogue, we undertook analysis of 4,255 public companies around the globe. Industry research, including our own, shows that companies with one or more women on their boards perform better on a variety of financial metrics than those without them.

On Tuesday, October 21st at 6pm Lauren Young, Money editor at Thomson Reuters, will moderate a panel title “Trading on Diversity – New Investment Vehicles Target Women’s Leadership for Progress and Profit.” The panel discussion will examine the array of new financial vehicles with gender diversity at the core of their investment strategy and why investing in diversity is emerging in the marketplace. The panel will consist of the following: (more…)

Thomson Reuters at the center of the Canadian community

Financial & Risk Summit

On Tuesday, Oct. 7, I opened our first-ever Thomson Reuters Financial & Risk Summit in Canada, with the new Chinese Ambassador to Canada as our keynote speaker. This was Ambassador Luo Zhaohui’s first public speaking engagement.

He reiterated China’s commitment to the growing trade with Canada – China is already Canada’s second-largest trading partner. He stated his belief that Canada should establish an offshore trading centre for Chinese currency, something Thomson Reuters is already working on.

To everyone’s delight, the ambassador spoke willingly about the student protests in Hong Kong, which have made headlines around the world in recent weeks. (more…)

My visit to Great Ormond Street Hospital with Radio Lollipop

By Loris Barisa, Managing Director, Thomson Reuters

We all know that familiar feeling we get every now and then. The one associated with questions like, “can I really do this? Will I feel uncomfortable?” Those were the questions I faced recently as I made my way to Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH), to meet up with Zeena Rashid from our London Partners team.

It all started at the sales conference in Paris earlier this year, when Mitko Iankov suggested that I ask Zeena what she does on Wednesday nights. Zeena made a great and passionate “pitch”. She energetically explained that she was supporting a charity called Radio Lollipop. That she visited a hospital for a few hours every Wednesday, volunteering her time to try to cheer up sick children. Since I thought this was a noble cause, I agreed to join her one evening and that evening finally arrived.

As I started to learn more about the hospital, that the volunteers spent most of their time with terminally ill children aged 1-16, I wondered what I had gotten myself into. Having two children of my own, I wondered how I would react and cope in this new situation and what I would see. (more…)

Open for business – Unlocking value from open data

image7

Professor Sir Nigel Shadbolt presented to an audience at our South Colonnade office last month in London as part of our TechVision series.

The open data paradox

It sounds paradoxical. How can you make money based on something that you get for free? Or stranger still, how can you make money whilst at the same time giving something away for free? Yet open data – “data or content … anyone is free to use, reuse, and redistribute” – is now a route for both new and established businesses.

The modern emphasis on open data is still relatively new. In the UK it really got started in 2009 when the UK government followed the Obama administration’s establishment of data.gov with its UK counterpart, data.gov.uk. Both were driven by the same principle – if the data is made available then people will do more innovative things with it than would originally have been thought possible – and the governments were amenable to this from the perspective of enabling transparency and scrutiny, as well as a source of economic opportunity following the financial crisis. (more…)

Employee profiles: Intelligent information starts with talent

At Thomson Reuters, we are trusted for the decisions that matter most, empowering customers to act with confidence in a complex world. Our intelligent information starts with talent. Businesses and professionals all over the globe rely on the people of Thomson Reuters to transform knowledge into action, so they can shape outcomes on the world stage. That’s why we’re showcasing some of our employees that help deliver solutions that enable our customers to do amazing things. Read the brief interviews below and check out the entire series here.

Justin Farmer – Director, Product Management (Legal)

Who inspires you, and why? 

Farmer

My family. And just not because they are my family but because they challenge me to have perspective. My two sons inspire me to think more simplistically. I asked my younger son one time, “What invention has helped human beings in their quest to walk through walls?” His response, without much thought, was, “A door.” A simple answer to what I thought might take him a long time to answer. My wife inspires me in many ways. Determination comes to mind. Above all else, though, she has taught me empathy. In my role, it is these qualities that I lean on daily to help me perform in my role.

What do you see as the key to successful innovation? 

I see many great ideas come from colleagues. However, most of them fall short as they do not represent a solution to a real problem. The key, as I see it, is in understanding the problem that you are trying to solve. You have to dig and find the root of issues, expose them and then solve them. I also think that simplicity is the next biggest key to innovation. Innovation comes when a problem is addressed in new and simplistic ways.

What was the best idea you’ve heard in the last week? 

Goats in Laguna Beach used for the Vegetation Management Project to help prevent wildfire threats to the city. Millions were spent prior to the goats. With the goats, the investment is around $400,000 and it is much more effective than the human labor and projects that preceded it.

What is the best leadership tip you’ve learned in your career?  (more…)